Journal

Weekend Links // June 13

Last week was fun as I worked with Fair Trade Services, a record label out of Nashville, on upcoming album art for one of their acts, CCM trio — and institution — Phillips, Craig & Dean. But, all that work meant less being social & no time for Weekend Links.

So, this will be a two week edition.

Here are 7 pieces of awesome from the last 2 weeks that you may have missed:

1. What We Storytellers Do

 
It’s what we storytellers do, Ms. Travers. We restore order with imagination. We instill hope again, and again, and again.
— Walt Disney, in Saving Mr. Banks
 

2. Courage: from Normandy to Tiananmen

In the last two weeks we've seen the anniversary of two remarkable moments of valor — the 25th anniversary of Tank Man standing alone in the face of the Chinese government & the 70th anniversary of the Allied troops storming the beach at Normandy on D-Day.

That got me thinking a bit.

 
 

Seventy years ago, on June 6th, 1944, with the fate of Western Civilization under threat, more than 300,000 brave kids from Great Britain, the United States & Canada landed as a collective force set diametrically opposed to the ravenous conquest of Europe by Nazi Germany. To more clearly define this, the bravery on display at D-Day was a collective expression of courage that changed the world.

Juxtapose that with June 5th, 1989. A seven-week long student-led protest against the Chinese government, favoring freedom of the press, speech & a slate of economic reforms, came to a frenzied climax as 300,000 Chinese military troops converged on Tiananmen Square a the heart of Beijing to clear the students from the square. As tanks rolled through Tiananmen, a lone man stepped in front of a line of tanks, blocking their path. The bravery of one, in the face of an immovable force, that changed a nation.

Juxtaposition is a beautiful thing, don't you think?

3. Capa's D-Day & Widener's Tiananmen

The courage in both of these momentous occasions was also documented by photographers who exhibited another kind of valor — the kind that goes weaponless into war.

Here are two short videos that commemorate the photographers behind the images you know so well.

Robert Capa's D-Day, from TIME Magazine:

 

Jeff Widener Reflects on Tiananmen, from the Wall Street Journal:

As an addendum to this, the story of Jeff Widener's negatives in the video above bear striking resemblance to the story of Capa's negatives from D-Day. The story goes something like this:

And although Capa shot approximately 106 frames on the beach, only a handful have survived. Though the exact number of surviving frames is uncertain, the actual negative of the picture known as The Face in the Surf, along with another from the set, was lost sometime after the photo’s publication in the June 19, 1944 issue of LIFE. It is, in a sense, a testament to the incalculable hardship and violence of the Longest Day that the only surviving photographic record of the Omaha Beach landing from the beach itself are nine hard-won, fragile, immensely powerful negatives. (source)

The images we take for granted are not easily captured or brought into view. The storytellers behind them must battle for everything they get.

4. The Photo That Made Me

VII photographer Christopher Morris recounts the story of the photograph that jump started his career in a new series on TIME.com.

Panama, 1989. Photo by Christopher Morris, VII, for TIME

Panama, 1989. Photo by Christopher Morris, VII, for TIME

 
The day before the photo was taken, though, two of these photographers were wounded, and, very sadly, José died after receiving a gunshot to his head. So I was left as the only photographer still working. This all happened at a time when I was really trying to break out as a news photographer. After this, I was put on contract for TIME.

This image gave me a new sense of self confidence — it showed me that I could control fear, something that in my earlier conflict work I had struggled with.
— Christopher Morris
 

This is the first installment in the series from TIME & I'm really excited to see what comes next.

5. #intheWAKEof

I started a new series on instagram that I'm rather excited about. To photograph a face is one thing, to photograph a person's character is something altogether different.

Often, when I'm wrestling with a new idea or want to experiment, photographically, I turn to my iPhone & see if I can make something meaningful in much the same way a painter might turn to their sketchbook.

Here is the first fruits of an experiment I'm calling #intheWAKEof. You'll have to read the full captions on instagram.com to get the full sense of what's at work here.

Also, you can follow me on Instagram by clicking on either image above to see where this series goes next.

6. Shooting News w/ an iPhone

Mike Castellucci, reporter for Dallas' ABC affiliate, WFAA, is well known in the area for his quirky human interest stories. I've always appreciated his point of view. So, I was excited when I heard he would be doing a segment on One by One. I freaked when I learned he would be shooting the entire story with his iPhone.

The finished piece aired this week. Here it is:

 
 

I don't know if this is the future of news... but if I had to guess, I would say:

 
The best way to predict the future is to create it.
— Peter Drucker
 

7. Ask Not

A couple of weeks ago, my friend Kyle Steed started a mural. Last week, he released a video that some friends of ours made documenting the process. There's a moment about halfway through when the sun comes out from behind the sun that's just way. too. good.

And, apparently the Mayor's office agrees:

 
 

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